How to Write a Marketing Content – Examples and Tips

Marketing content is at the core of promoting businesses in the digital world. Creating content that can help ideas stick, influence consumer behaviors, and promote products and services is a tricky job. Jones Miles, an online Marketing expert at GoAssignmentHelp, says, “Today, the word-of-mouth publicity has transmuted to spreading of information and influence through social networks. For small business owners, creating viral content is the most effective way to harness the power of social media and online marketing.”

So what makes certain ideas, products, actions, or stories stick in our minds more than others? Let us decode how to create effective marketing content:

Less is More

Assignment helper Prius Myers gives an excellent example to explain this phenomenon. He says, “Suppose you visit Dell’s website to buy a laptop. Each listing on the site presents a long list of information about PC cards, media base, docking ports, modular options, memory keys, types of DVD drives, etc. You have no clue about the technology – and despite extensive information, you are at a loss on which laptop to buy. Now, imagine seeing a video of each laptop where you can see it from all angles and check out its best features by clicking on it. Wouldn’t that make it easier for you to decide which one to buy?”

Many times, when businesses describe their products, they make the mistake of using nuanced and complex messages. They think that by telling more about the product, they will impress a potential buyer. The truth is when you learn a lot about a topic at once, you forget most of it instantly. The best strategy is to choose one or two best features of the product and build your marketing content around it. Such content will be easier to understand and have longer retention duration.

Use Analogies to Introduce a New Idea

Riteish Mukherjee from GoAssignmentHelp shares, “When Facebook first came out, it was portrayed as an online yearbook. People treasure their high school yearbooks as they spark memories of their old friends and teachers and instantly associated Facebook with an online medium to stay in touch with their friends.”

Analogies are effective ways to communicate unfamiliar ideas to an audience. They make your marketing content more relatable. Experts suggest that you should use an analogy to explain something, present complex or abstract arguments or concepts more simply, or compare and contrast two or more products or services.

Minnie Sietelman, who helps MBA students in assignment writing, warns, “One has to be careful while using an analogy. It should not be used as a core idea but to support and explain the idea. You should also be sure that your target audience knows what you are referring to when you make an analogy. Someone who is not interested in sports would not understand a basketball analogy. Similarly, people who are not Marvel fans would not relate with Ironheart or X-23 analogies.”

An analogy must also be related to your idea or product in some way for it to be effective. You may compare Content Marketing with Farming as both are related to the creation, planting seeds (content), growing, and producing fruits (results). Both of them use tools. Land can be related to the context of content and user-interface can be related to soil in the agricultural farm.

Create Curiosity Gaps

The most effective marketing campaign is one that successfully makes people want to know more about the topic. Serve them with an appetizer that makes them want to devour the whole meal. A popular assignment writer in the UK, Simranjeet Chaddha, says, “The advent of websites like Upworthy and Buzzfeed has made the concept of ‘curiosity gap’ quite popular. Earlier, the print media was known for long well-researched articles or salacious rumors and gossips – depending on their target audience. In the world of online marketing content, clickbait and snackable content are driving revenues and traffic. The audience of today has smartphones with RSS feeds. It needs more than rhetorical questions and trick content to stir their curiosity and make them click a headline and compel them to read a blog post or an article.”

According to Simranjeet, four ways to implement the curiosity technique while creating marketing content are:

  • Create an irresistible headline: Upworthy requires its writers to come up with at least 25 headlines per article. It pushes writers to brainstorm on writing a headline that gives the user enough information to decide whether he or she wants to read article or not but is not detailed enough to say it all in one line. The ideal headline is one that balances information with intrigue.
  • Publish your content frequently: Giants like HubSpot and popular newspaper websites publish a ton of content every day. This helps them to cover a wide range of topics to cater to different types of audiences. There’s another advantage. If some of the content does not perform well, other articles take over. It becomes a game of numbers. More you publish; more are the chances of making your marketing content go viral.
  • Perform A/B tests of your content: Publishing often also gives businesses the power to experiment with their headlines, type of content they publish, and social media marketing or online marketing strategies they implement. You can analyze which content piece performs better than others and use the insights to refine and tweak your content strategy.
  • Post content that goes viral on social media networks: Engagement with the audience is the currency in the world of marketing. Hence, businesses that promote contests and quizzes like ‘Which car are you?” and “Which Marvel superhero you look like?” draw more traffic through social shares.

Whether you have a small business or a large business, you work for-profit or a non-profit, these simple marketing content strategies can help you leverage the power of digital platforms and increase your revenues several-fold.

How to Write a Marketing Content – Examples and Tips was last updated January 16th, 2021 by Lucy Miranda

Comments are closed.